ruckawriter:

Ray Lonnen - 18 May 1940 - 11 July 2014.

Ray Lonnen passed away yesterday after a three-year battle with cancer.

He’s not known for many roles, to tell the truth. He’s best known to those of us who watched The Sandbaggers as Willie Caine. He was charming, he was honest, he was funny, he was absolutely believable. He was the most human spy I’d ever seen on screen, big or small. Not the maudlin self-pity of George Smiley, nor the furious misogyny of James Bond. The one time Willie had a chance for romance, they both ended up with a broken heart. The scene in question had such an impact on me, I pretty much stole if for a bit in Lazarus #3.

I always hoped that, if Queen & Country ever made it to whatever screen, I’d be able to convince whoever was making it to give Lonnen a part, however small. Just a nod to Willie, who is Tara’s father in so very many ways. Just a moment in the Ops Room, something. Just a chance to say thank you.

I suppose what I’m saying is that he gave me, and many others, joy. I didn’t know him, and now I shall never have the honor. But I am sincerely grateful for what he shared with the world, what he shared with me when I was fifteen, sixteen, and looking for those things in the world that would speak to me.

Rest in peace, Mister Lonnen.

ruckawriter:

Ray Lonnen - 18 May 1940 - 11 July 2014.

Ray Lonnen passed away yesterday after a three-year battle with cancer.

He’s not known for many roles, to tell the truth. He’s best known to those of us who watched The Sandbaggers as Willie Caine. He was charming, he was honest, he was funny, he was absolutely believable. He was the most human spy I’d ever seen on screen, big or small. Not the maudlin self-pity of George Smiley, nor the furious misogyny of James Bond. The one time Willie had a chance for romance, they both ended up with a broken heart. The scene in question had such an impact on me, I pretty much stole if for a bit in Lazarus #3.

I always hoped that, if Queen & Country ever made it to whatever screen, I’d be able to convince whoever was making it to give Lonnen a part, however small. Just a nod to Willie, who is Tara’s father in so very many ways. Just a moment in the Ops Room, something. Just a chance to say thank you.

I suppose what I’m saying is that he gave me, and many others, joy. I didn’t know him, and now I shall never have the honor. But I am sincerely grateful for what he shared with the world, what he shared with me when I was fifteen, sixteen, and looking for those things in the world that would speak to me.

Rest in peace, Mister Lonnen.

liartownusa:

Crossword Puzzle No.1

liartownusa:

Crossword Puzzle No.1

liartownusa:

Why They Did It

liartownusa:

Why They Did It

Any plans for NFL Superpro? I think he could be made into a good joke character about lame heroes from the old comics like how D-Man is.
Anonymous

brevoortformspring:

We don’t have the rights to NFL SuperPro.

And also, I don’t know so much what the point is in making fun of supposedly lame characters like D-Man is. For all that people may laugh at him, he’s proven himself much more heroic on many more occasions on those that would call him foolish.

On the other hand, you might like DOWN, SET, FIGHT! from Oni Press.

liartownusa:

The Lobby

liartownusa:

The Lobby

joshreads:

DO IT LES
DON’T YOU FUCKING TEASE US
WE WANT YOUR BODY SMEARED ACROSS SUNSET BOULEVARD BY THE END OF THE DAY

joshreads:

DO IT LES

DON’T YOU FUCKING TEASE US

WE WANT YOUR BODY SMEARED ACROSS SUNSET BOULEVARD BY THE END OF THE DAY

liartownusa:

Dragonlords of Werner, Werner & Fulk

Written by Donald L. Brampthorne and Kyle McCulloch


James Ensor, Skeletons Fighting over a Pickled Herring
1891

James Ensor, Skeletons Fighting over a Pickled Herring

1891

comicsalliance:

SAN DIEGO COMIC-CON DOESN’T WANT TO ADDRESS ITS HARASSMENT PROBLEM BECAUSE PEOPLE MIGHT THINK IT HAS A HARASSMENT PROBLEM
By Chris Sims
San Diego’s Comic-Con International has a problem that it doesn’t want to address. See, a few weeks back, a group called GeeksForCONsent launched a petition urging Comic-Con to adopt a formal harassment policy in place of the broad, basically unenforceable “code of conduct” that’s currently in place. Like many conventions, SDCC has a huge problem with women — particularly women cosplayers — being harassed by other con-goers and dubious media “professionals”, and the present policy offers victims little recourse.
Comic-Con’s existing policy, which can be found in its 200-page programming guide and on the event’s website, is as follows:

Attendees must respect common sense rules for public behavior, personal interaction, common courtesy, and respect for private property. Harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated. Comic-Con reserves the right to revoke, without refund, the membership and badge of any attendee not in compliance with this policy. Persons finding themselves in a situation where they feel their safety is at risk or who become aware of an attendee not in compliance with this policy should immediately locate a member of security, or a staff member, so that the matter can be handled in an expeditious manner.

GeeksForCONsent’s petition asks that Comic-Con amend the policy thusly:
A harassment reporting mechanism and visible, easy to find on-site support for people who report harassment.
Signs throughout the convention publicizing the harassment policy and zero-tolerance enforcement mechanisms.
Information for attendees on how to report harassment.
A one-hour training for volunteers on how to respond to harassment reports.
As a response to the petition, David Glanzer, Comic-Con’s director of marketing and public relations — someone whose actual job is to talk to the media about this sort of thing — gave a remarkable interview to CBR‘s Albert Ching where he suggested, astonishingly, that instituting a more explicit anti-harassment policy would be a problem in and of itself, because people in the media and the attendee base might think that Comic-Con has a problem with harassment.

…because we’re really an international show, and have 3,000 members of the media, I think the story would be harassment is such an issue at Comic-Con that they needed to post these signs around there. Now, people within the industry, and fans, know that isn’t the case, but the general public out there, and I think the news media, might look at this as, “Why would you, if this wasn’t such a bad issue, why do you feel the need to single out this one issue and put signs up about it?” I think that’s a concern.


That’s not really how rules work.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

SAN DIEGO COMIC-CON DOESN’T WANT TO ADDRESS ITS HARASSMENT PROBLEM BECAUSE PEOPLE MIGHT THINK IT HAS A HARASSMENT PROBLEM

By Chris Sims

San Diego’s Comic-Con International has a problem that it doesn’t want to address. See, a few weeks back, a group called GeeksForCONsent launched a petition urging Comic-Con to adopt a formal harassment policy in place of the broad, basically unenforceable “code of conduct” that’s currently in place. Like many conventions, SDCC has a huge problem with women — particularly women cosplayers — being harassed by other con-goers and dubious media “professionals”, and the present policy offers victims little recourse.

Comic-Con’s existing policy, which can be found in its 200-page programming guide and on the event’s website, is as follows:

Attendees must respect common sense rules for public behavior, personal interaction, common courtesy, and respect for private property. Harassing or offensive behavior will not be tolerated. Comic-Con reserves the right to revoke, without refund, the membership and badge of any attendee not in compliance with this policy. Persons finding themselves in a situation where they feel their safety is at risk or who become aware of an attendee not in compliance with this policy should immediately locate a member of security, or a staff member, so that the matter can be handled in an expeditious manner.

GeeksForCONsent’s petition asks that Comic-Con amend the policy thusly:

  • A harassment reporting mechanism and visible, easy to find on-site support for people who report harassment.
  • Signs throughout the convention publicizing the harassment policy and zero-tolerance enforcement mechanisms.
  • Information for attendees on how to report harassment.
  • A one-hour training for volunteers on how to respond to harassment reports.

As a response to the petition, David Glanzer, Comic-Con’s director of marketing and public relations — someone whose actual job is to talk to the media about this sort of thing — gave a remarkable interview to CBR‘s Albert Ching where he suggested, astonishingly, that instituting a more explicit anti-harassment policy would be a problem in and of itself, because people in the media and the attendee base might think that Comic-Con has a problem with harassment.

…because we’re really an international show, and have 3,000 members of the media, I think the story would be harassment is such an issue at Comic-Con that they needed to post these signs around there. Now, people within the industry, and fans, know that isn’t the case, but the general public out there, and I think the news media, might look at this as, “Why would you, if this wasn’t such a bad issue, why do you feel the need to single out this one issue and put signs up about it?” I think that’s a concern.

That’s not really how rules work.

READ MORE

brevoorthistoryofcomics:


BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS #1 1986 
I was never much of a Batman fan—popular theory has it that children either love Superman or Batman, depending on their particular psyche, and I was clearly in the Superman camp. I’d read some decent Batman stories over the years, but nothing that really enamored me of the character. 
And, truth to tell, I’m still not a big Batman booster. But DARK KNIGHT came close to changing that, at least with this first issue. I remember having returned with the highly-anticipated book from Captain Blue Hen in Newark, DE (my regular comic shop for most of the 80s, which is still in business today.), and cracking it open. For the duration of these 48 pages, I wasn’t anywhere but within the pages, immersed in the story. 
The follow-up issues failed to strike my fancy in the same way, each subsequent one feeling less and less like a Batman story to me, and more like some bizarre Judge Dredd/Robocop affair that happened to star some guy in a bat-costume. I thought it was overrated then, and I still think so now. 
Except for that first issue.

When Chris Sims and Matt Wilson of the War Rocket Ajax podcast added The Dark Knight Returns to their Every Story Ever list, Sims blamed TDKR for the constant incidence of “Batman fights Superman” stories since (including the forthcoming Batman v Superman movie). Although they placed it high on the list, Sims noted that he would happily erase TDKR from existence if it meant never seeing another Batman/Superman fight.

brevoorthistoryofcomics:

BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS #1
1986

I was never much of a Batman fan—popular theory has it that children either love Superman or Batman, depending on their particular psyche, and I was clearly in the Superman camp. I’d read some decent Batman stories over the years, but nothing that really enamored me of the character.

And, truth to tell, I’m still not a big Batman booster. But DARK KNIGHT came close to changing that, at least with this first issue. I remember having returned with the highly-anticipated book from Captain Blue Hen in Newark, DE (my regular comic shop for most of the 80s, which is still in business today.), and cracking it open. For the duration of these 48 pages, I wasn’t anywhere but within the pages, immersed in the story.

The follow-up issues failed to strike my fancy in the same way, each subsequent one feeling less and less like a Batman story to me, and more like some bizarre Judge Dredd/Robocop affair that happened to star some guy in a bat-costume. I thought it was overrated then, and I still think so now.

Except for that first issue.

When Chris Sims and Matt Wilson of the War Rocket Ajax podcast added The Dark Knight Returns to their Every Story Ever list, Sims blamed TDKR for the constant incidence of “Batman fights Superman” stories since (including the forthcoming Batman v Superman movie). Although they placed it high on the list, Sims noted that he would happily erase TDKR from existence if it meant never seeing another Batman/Superman fight.